Accueil
 
Version française English version
Home > Objectives > Core courses

Core courses


This program is concentrated first on the acquisition of general methods and strategies which can be used for a vast group of materials.

First-year master (M1)

The objectives of M1 are : identifying the main properties of materials, classifying materials regarding with their properties, classifying materials regarding their structure, associating properties and structure of materials, identifying the different scales within a material.

Second-year master (M2)

The physical mechanisms governing the mechanical performances of metals, alloys and polymers are first analyzed at the scale of the phenomenon (the nanometer or the micron scale).This microscopic view inspires the development of models for the mechanical behaviour of materials at the relevant length scale (i.e. at the scale of the object). In both cases, the emphasis is put on the robustness and the generic nature of the approaches.

Slip band traces at the surface of a TA6V titanium alloys employed for aerospace applications.

Slip band traces at the surface of a TA6V titanium alloys employed for aerospace applications.

Besides, an important objective of this program is to discover modern experimental techniques to characterize the materials properties required to feed the models.And finally, it will be shown how to implement these models in finite element codes so as to simulate the behaviour of components with complex geometries and subjected to complex loading conditions.

Displacement fields at the surface of a sample acquired using the digital image correlation code Correli. A crack is detected and the location of its tip can be clearly seen in these figures.

Displacement fields at the surface of a sample acquired using the digital image correlation code Correli. A crack is detected and the location of its tip can be clearly seen in these figures.

The objective of the first part of the program is to provide modern tools (conceptual, experimental and numerical) so as to deal with problems in the field of the mechanics of materials. These tools are first explained during lectures and then practiced through problem sets and laboratory sessions. You will have the opportunity to perform various experiments and measurements on research laboratory devices (more than 30 hours of laboratory work per student in this first part of the program). Beside, you will have also the opportunity to use complex materials models during finite elements simulations sessions.Stress field in the vicinity of a notch in a polycrystalline steel, computed using the finite element method. The crystal orientations of grains were collected using back scattered electron diffraction (BSED) and then used in the finite element code so as to define the individual behaviour of each grain and then the stresses in the microstructure (polycrystal). (Libert)

Stress field in the vicinity of a notch in a polycrystalline steel, computed using the finite element method. The crystal orientations of grains were collected using back scattered electron diffraction (BSED) and then used in the finite element code so as to define the individual behaviour of each grain and then the stresses in the microstructure (polycrystal). (Libert)
 

This balance between practice of modern experimental and numerical methods and the teaching of new concepts during theoretical courses is the ”trademark” of this program. A careful attention will be paid to this point, in particular through the use of « labs books » that will be used to create continuity between the theoretical courses and the lab sessions. The methodologies and skills developed in this program will be useful in both research & development and industrial production jobs.


logo ParisTech
logo ENSAM ParisTech
logo Polytechnique ParisTech
logo MINES ParisTech
Logo ENS Cachan
logo ECP
Logo ESPCI
Blanc
ParisSaclay
PSL